Porn Addict Meets Match In ‘don Jon’; Tame Blues: Movies

But he prefers porn. Thats his dilemma when he meets a blonde princess named Barbara Sugarman (Scarlett Johansson), who calls on a sirens array of erotic artillery to reduce him to jello. Porn she absolutely forbids, no discussion. But hes an addict. Though its set in New Jersey rather than Brooklyn , Don Jon — written and directed with frenzied energy by Gordon-Levitt — cheerfully steals from the 1977 Saturday Night Fever in its tale of an Italian-American stud-slash-dolt who harbors a spark of life that draws him toward the wider world. Its even more condescending to the small-minded characters around him, if thats possible. Don Jon is also fast and funny. Jons deliverance comes in the form of a messed-up pothead named Esther who sees through his insulation and tells him what he needs to hear. The down-shift from cartoon romance to romantic drama would be jarring if Esther were played by a lesser actress than Julianne Moore, who makes the wisdom shes given to deliver sound like good hard sense from an older woman whos been through hell. Shes touching, Johansson is wonderfully awful and Gordon-Levitt is electric, making it easy to forgive the movie its meannesses. Unless you happen to be Italian-American. Don Jon, from Relativity Media, is playing across the U.S. Rating: **** (Seligman) Muscle Shoals Songs as energizing as When a Man Loves a Woman and Brown Sugar leave us wanting more, so maybe its fitting that a documentary about the place that delivered those gutbucket classics does the same.

12 Movies That Are Just As Good As The Books They’re Based On

Night of the Living Dead his first film is another great choice but Dawn of the Dead has a soft spot with me and is a film I have seen no less then 30 times. I encourage those who have not seen it to check it out especially if you are a younger film fan who has only seen the recent remake by Zach Snyder which was a quite polished take on the original but still not the movie that started it all. Pontypool Go Canada! As a Canadian it warms my heart when a really great film comes out of the great white north. Pontypool is not for everyone as it leans more to wards a more intellectual horror fan but its the story of an apocalyptic event in a small town in Ontario that unfolds as a radio DJ is on air. There was a terrible American version starring Bill Moseley called Dead Air do not confuse the two. Pontypool plays out like a stage play and is a truly monumental apocalyptic movie with so many fine points from its script to its cast and its overall look and feel. Planet of the Apes What is scarier then the world coming to an end? Mark Wahlberg saving it? Ok I joke! I am not talking about Tim Burtons remake or even the most recent one starring James Franco which was a fun twist.

5 Movies to Watch When The World Ends Friday

5 Movies to Watch When The World Ends Friday

“Drive” The neo-noir novel is great, but could get lost among a sea of other well-written pulp fiction books. The movie, on the other hand, is unique: It’s at once campy and subtly touching. And, okay, it’s also Ryan Gosling at his best. “Silence of the Lambs” This novel was critically acclaimed — Roald Dahl called it, “subtle, horrific and splendid, the best book I have read in a long time,” and David Foster Wallace used to assign it to his students. But Hannibal’s eeriness is simply better conveyed on film. “The Godfather” Mario Puzo co-wrote the film version of his book, so he shouldn’t take offense to this one. The movie is better if only because of the impact it’s had on the way Americans view their individual nationalities and ethnicities. It doesn’t hurt that it’s widely considered one of the greatest films of all time, either. “Fight Club” Aside from the Hollywoodification of the story’s ending, the movie stays true to the mood and dialogue of the book. Sure, the romantic ending may be a little sappy, but, oddly enough, author Chuck Palahniuk prefers it, stating that the story is about a man reaching a point where he can commit to a relationship. “Hugo” The inventive children’s story of a boy and his automaton is brought to life by Martin Scorsese, who made the film so that his young daughter could finally experience his work. Author Brian Selznick watched an array of ’30s films in writing the book, and the story champions the magic of film, so it’s only fitting that the movie is a total gem. “Jaws” The book sold remarkably well when it was published, in spite of disputes over its title (both “The Stillness in the Water” and “The Jaws of Death” were considered by author Peter Benchley).